PROGRAM NOTES 02/24/17- This weeks show features stories from SPUTNIK RADIO, RADIO HAVANA CUBA, SPANISH NATIONAL RADIO, and NHK WORLD RADIO JAPAN.

From RUSSIA- On his show called Going Underground, Afshin Rattansi interviewed Nick Dearden about the passage of CETA, the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement. It has been called the little brother of TTIP. Passing despite protests, this trade deal between Canada and the EU has less to do with tariffs and more to do with removing social and environmental protections. It allows corporations to sue governments for impeding business, negating individual national sovereignty.

From CUBA- Thousands in the UK protested Donald Trump, who may be allowed to visit the country despite 1.8 million signatures demanding he be barred from entering. In Barcelona, up to 500,000 people took to the streets demanding that the government allow more refugees to enter the country. More than 200 protestors arrested in DC on Inauguration day have been indicted on felony rioting charges. Israeli military aircraft carried out overnight bombing raids against Syrian army positions north of Damascus.

From SPAIN- Alison Hughes reports on the Washington meeting between Donald Trump and Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu- Trump refused to defend the two-state solution between Israel and Palestine, saying that the one-state plan was fine with him. The Stockholm International Peace Research Institute released its latest report on international weapons sales- the 3 largest dealers are the US with 33% of all sales, Russia with 23%, and China with 6%. India has become the largest importer of weapons, while sales to countries in the Middle East rose by 86%.

From JAPAN- Weapons manufacturers are showcasing their latest wares at an international arms fair in the United arab Emirates. New US Defense Secretary James Mattis visited Iraq to discuss military operations against ISIL and to clarify that the US military is not in Iraq to seize the oil, despite Trump's threats. UNICEF released an emergency statement saying that the famine in Nigeria, Somalia, South Sudan, and Yemen may cause 1.4 million children to die from malnutrition.

"I think our TV news editors are still sometimes using the language of government propaganda. We still hear the term 'war on terror' for an illegal war. We're still hearing the words reform and modernization when what we really mean is privatization and public greed."
--Ken Loach